Friday, April 29, 2016

Readers Write In: Three Snakes to ID in One Pic!


I have seen this snake in my backyard twice in the last 2 weeks.  I am particularly worried as I have dogs who play in the yard.  They are inside dogs, but go out in the yard several times a day... I have been told this is a water moccasin.  There is a bayou behind my house, which has dried up due to lack of rain so I suppose it could have been forced from its regular home.

Can you please confirm whether this snake is venomous or not and what I can do if it is?

Thanks,


Donna K.
Texas





Thank you so much! I think this is three snakes...but could the dark one be actually part of the lower brown one??

Carole P.
Maryland

  








My cat brought another one in this morning and here are the photos. Some are rather blurry, but hopefully you can ascertain what kind it is. BYT it did have a distinct smell, Copperhead????
   

Deb E. D.
Missouri



What Are These Snakes?
-----

Snake Identification Post Ground Rules

-Guesses are welcome and encouraged. Don't worry if you're not an expert, wrong guesses allow us to talk about how to distinguish between the various species and that's why I run these posts.

-If you can't explain why you think a snake is a particular species, go ahead and just say what you think it is. But otherwise please do let us all know how you identified the animal. If you're wrong, we can explain why. If you're right, this helps everyone learn how to identify snakes, which is the point of these posts.

-This is not a pop quiz, any kind of research is encouraged and I hope you will engage with other commenters to try to figure these snakes out. I will eventually chime in with my thoughts.

-Assume I know what kind of snake is in the picture. I run these posts because they are outreach opportunities. Please don't send me private e-mails with your guesses, include them below.

-Remember, the person that sent me the picture is probably reading your comments. Although it is frustrating to know that many of these snakes have been killed, these people do want to learn more about them. More snake knowledge will lead to fewer snakes being killed. Don't hate, educate.

Sunday, April 17, 2016

Readers Write In: This 12-year old found a Cottonmouth in the yard, you'll never guess what her dad did next.

Sometimes I get e-mails that are such a nice change of pace I just decide to include them as blog posts (another example here).

My 12 year old daughter was in the back yard when I called her to come in. I didn't see any critters but her at first. Then I looked away for a second. Suddenly she yelled "Snake! Snake! When I looked back I saw this little guy as my daughter blazed passed me like a rocket to get away.

Turns out it was a cotton mouth!


I used the broom to remind him which way to leave.

He wiggled his tail and showed me his fangs then continued peacefully on his way.

Our back yard is a popular place for snakes.

We had a Florida ring neck we named Mr. Wiggles.

We have a black racer we named Mr. Black. He lives in the bushes and sometimes the garage.

Now this guy. We named him Rex. I hope he stays in the woods out back.

Sincerely,


Christophor M.

Friday, April 15, 2016

Readers Write In: Possibly a Rattler but could also be a Moccasin Snake ID

Dear Sir or Madam,


I encountered this juvenile snake last night on the road in our mostly pastoral and densely wooded neighborhood community of small horse farms outside of Charleston South Carolina.  It did not have rattles on its tail, it had a black and white checkered underbelly and was about 15 inches long. It shook it's tail at my dog and I and made several attempts to strike us as we tried to identify it by just looking at it.

Answers have ranged from rattlesnake to copperhead to corn snake to bull snake from various non scientist or non herpetologist friends that I texted and asked their opinion.

I am leaning towards corn snake or copperhead? What do you think ?

 Thank you most kindly,

Jaime P.

South Carolina




Can you please tell me what kind of snake this is. I live in the city of lafayette. It was on some flagstone on my back porch. 

Anonymous
Louisiana







I'm curious about a snake seen down south possibly a rattler but could also be a moccasin.

Shauna K.
"Down South"


What Are These Snakes?
-----

Snake Identification Post Ground Rules

-Guesses are welcome and encouraged. Don't worry if you're not an expert, wrong guesses allow us to talk about how to distinguish between the various species and that's why I run these posts.

-If you can't explain why you think a snake is a particular species, go ahead and just say what you think it is. But otherwise please do let us all know how you identified the animal. If you're wrong, we can explain why. If you're right, this helps everyone learn how to identify snakes, which is the point of these posts.

-This is not a pop quiz, any kind of research is encouraged and I hope you will engage with other commenters to try to figure these snakes out. I will eventually chime in with my thoughts.

-Assume I know what kind of snake is in the picture. I run these posts because they are outreach opportunities. Please don't send me private e-mails with your guesses, include them below.

-Remember, the person that sent me the picture is probably reading your comments. Although it is frustrating to know that many of these snakes have been killed, these people do want to learn more about them. More snake knowledge will lead to fewer snakes being killed. Don't hate, educate.

Friday, April 1, 2016

Readers Write In: One of These Snake IDs is Not Like The Others

I live on the swamp in Southeast Louisiana. The recent flooding of the Pearl River brought the snake to our back porch. We have had our share of rat snakes and cottonmouth snakes and other water snakes, but the triangular head struck me as odd. I just can't seem to bring myself to get close enough to look him in the eyes to determine if they are vertical or rounded. I have also heard that you can look inside the mouth for the white cotton appearance, not happening! Anyway, we are under the impression it is either a cottonmouth or a banded water snake. It was about 4 feet long and mostly black on the belly. I would be extremely grateful for a better way to identify venomous vs non-venomous snakes without having to get overly personal with them. I have small kids and animals that roam the yard. I would like to have a better way to make the decision to move them or kill them since I know the opportunities will come again. Thanks for your assistance.

Keith E.
Louisiana




Found this fellow under the hood of my truck. Any ideas? 

Andrew C.
Nashville, TN





Please help identify-thank you for your help.

Blessed to be His,   


Jeannette W.
Stanly County, NC



What Are These Snakes?
-----

Snake Identification Post Ground Rules

-Guesses are welcome and encouraged. Don't worry if you're not an expert, wrong guesses allow us to talk about how to distinguish between the various species and that's why I run these posts.

-If you can't explain why you think a snake is a particular species, go ahead and just say what you think it is. But otherwise please do let us all know how you identified the animal. If you're wrong, we can explain why. If you're right, this helps everyone learn how to identify snakes, which is the point of these posts.

-This is not a pop quiz, any kind of research is encouraged and I hope you will engage with other commenters to try to figure these snakes out. I will eventually chime in with my thoughts.

-Assume I know what kind of snake is in the picture. I run these posts because they are outreach opportunities. Please don't send me private e-mails with your guesses, include them below.

-Remember, the person that sent me the picture is probably reading your comments. Although it is frustrating to know that many of these snakes have been killed, these people do want to learn more about them. More snake knowledge will lead to fewer snakes being killed. Don't hate, educate.